22 Educating all Business Students About Their Careers: Integrating Career Development Learning in Classrooms

PRESENTATION OVERVIEW FROM CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Lisa Higashi & Yas Azarapajouh, Simon Fraser University

For educational institutions, there is pressure to teach “hard skills” and career development skills for students to succeed (Hansen, 2012). This shift has led to career education becoming an integral component for all students in their undergraduate programs. At a large comprehensive university, which is primarily a commuter campus, engaging students to participate in voluntary career development workshops can be a challenge. At the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University, all Bachelor of Business students are required to complete six career development workshops prior to graduation. For optimal impact, the Career Management Centre has integrated our workshops into three core business classes to work with business students at different points of their educational program. Join us to learn about how faculty and staff at SFU have collaborated to plan and deliver innovative career development models. Using the online learning medium traditionally used by faculty, new career development modules have been designed that incorporate various multi-platform media tools and strategies. In addition we have been bridging the gap between academics and industry by inviting professionals to interact with students to develop their skills for a career advantage.

KEY WORDS

  • Integration
  • Collaboration
  • Strategic
  • Education
  • Service
  • Curricular
  • Co-curricular
  • Mandatory
  • Assessment
  • Experiential

 

BIO

Lisa Higashi, Simon Fraser University

Lisa has a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology with a minor in counselling and human development. She also has a Masters of Education: Educational Leadership from Simon Fraser University, BC. Her professional background in student development consists of a combination of international advising, student recruitment, student leadership and career development at both community college and universities. Currently in her role as Manager, Undergraduate Careers, for SFU Beedie School of Business, she enjoys working with students from orientation to graduation and beyond, contributing to their personal and professional development.

No Bio Provided for Azarapajouh, Simon Fraser University

 

LINK TO PRESENTATION

Click here to view presentation.

 

SUMMARY

Key Findings

  • SFU Beedie School of Business has been working on an innovated approach to educating all of our students on their career development
  • With a flexible program and being primarily a commuter school, we have incorporated 2 levels of career learning into 2 stages of their BBA program

Level 1 – 6 Career Development workshops which must be completed in the first 12 months

Level 2 – Career Development integrated into BUS 343 (introduction to marketing)

  • We have created a model that weaves the education and services to maximize career services resources for our students
  • Building relationships with administration and faculty is an integral part to embedding career development at different stages of an academic program

Next Steps

Assess the impact of career learning integrated into curriculum.

References

Cheung, R. & Jin, Q. (2016). Impact of career exploration course on career decision making, adaptability, and relational support in Hong Kong. Journal of Career Assessment 24(3), 481-496. Doi: 10.1144/0069072715599390

Folsom, B. & Reardon R. (2003). College career courses: design and accountability. Journal of Career Assessment. 11,(4). 421-450. Doi: 10.1177/1069072703255875

Hansen, R. S. (2011). Integrating career development techniques into the business school curriculum: tools for better preparing our graduates for successful careers. International Business & Economics Research Journal 1(2), 83-81.

Jackson, D. & Wilton, N. (2016). Career management attitudes among business undergraduates. Australian Journal of Career Development. 25(1). 7-22. Doi: 10.1177/1038416215604002

Simon Fraser University, Institutional Research and Planning http://www.sfu.ca/irp.html

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