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42 Do You Support International Students from Hong Kong and China? What I Learned from Visiting Career Centres in Hong Kong and China

PRESENTATION OVERVIEW FROM CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Doug Leong, Simon Fraser University

Career guidance, career development and career planning in Western society is significantly different than in Hong Kong and China (Fan and Leong, 2016). As a result of the different characteristics of Chinese culture, such as collectivism versus individualism, career planning and career development will be different than in Western society and “career development and intervention concerns have not been separated from relationship issues” (Fan and Leong, 2016, p. 194). According to Fan and Leong (2016), it is critical for career planning to be culturally inclusive in order to be beneficial and relevant to Chinese students. To effectively support students from Hong Kong and China, it is critical to understand the knowledge and resources students receive from career centres at various universities in Hong Kong and China. By understanding how Chinese students utilize career centres; how they search for employment; what supports students receive, and what resources are provided, career centres will be able to have a better understanding of the needs of these students and, thus, deliver more targeted workshops and more effective one-on-one support to students from China. This can include topics such as career planning and development, writing professional business cover letters and resumes, interviewing skills, networking, and job search strategies (including the use of social media).

Key Words:

  • Understanding
  • Knowledge
  • Support
  • Family
  • Engagement
  • Connecting

 

BIO

Doug Leong, Simon Fraser University
Doug is currently working as the Associate Director, MBA Careers at Simon Fraser University. Doug is responsible for providing career support for graduate students in the full-time and part-time MBA program. Doug has over 10 years’ experience in the career management field including spearheading the start-up, and management of a career services department at a private college in Calgary, Alberta. Doug’s professional work experience includes teaching in the public education system; managing a community program in the not-for-profit industry, and working as a business analyst for a national company. Doug has been involved in education for over 20 years, including working in higher education for over 12 years. His roles have included working as a faculty member, admissions advisor, and a career advisor. Doug received his Masters of Education Degree, specializing in Enrollment Management, from Capella University. Doug also holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Education from the University of Alberta, and a Bachelor’s of Physical Education Degree from the University of Calgary.

 

LINK TO PRESENTATION

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SUMMARY

Overview

As a result of the different characteristics of Chinese culture, such as collectivism versus individualism, career planning and career development will be different than in Western society and “career development and intervention concerns have not been separated from relationship issues” (Fan and Leong, 2016, p. 194). To effectively work with students from China, it’s important to have a better understanding of the importance of education in Chinese culture, the pressures students face, and the how education plays a critical role in family success.

Key Findings

Chinese students have been raised around the message of how success in education means future success for the family. This message is emphasized and reinforced as soon as children are school age. By the time students reach grade 12, they are in school and studying for 12+ hours/day. The pressure for many of them to score well on the Chinese National Exam (NCEE) is reflective on the sacrifices many families make in order for their children to be successful on the exam.

Learning about the job market in China and how students write resumes, network, and connect is important for career advisors who work with Chinese students. To be more effective as a career advisor, it’s important to have a background understanding of how Chinese students choose majors and search for jobs.

Next steps

I will be presenting my information to other career advising staff at SFU who work with Chinese students.

Implications to Career Education

The growth of international Chinese students attending post-secondary has risen significantly.

There has been 92% increase in international students in Canada between 2008 – 2015.

There were 353,000 international students in Canada in 2015 – 34% (highest) students from China.

Additional References

Canadian Bureau for International Education. (2016). Canada’s Performance and Potential in International Education: International Students in Canada. Retrieved from http://cbie.ca/media/facts-and-figures/

Fan, W. & Leong, Frederick T.L. (2016). Career Development and Intervention in Chinese Contexts. The Career Development Quarterly, 64(3), 192-202.

Zhou, X., Li, X. & Gao, Y. (2016). Career Guidance and Counseling in Shanghai, China: 1977 to 2015. The Career Development Quarterly, 64, 203-214.

License

Do You Support International Students from Hong Kong and China? What I Learned from Visiting Career Centres in Hong Kong and China Copyright © 2017 by Various Authors. All Rights Reserved.

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